Children can extract subject-verb sequences that lack time and correspondence for production. Object clauses are most frequently introduced by the conjunction “das”, which is often omitted. For example, I think she is tired. – I think she`s tired. I was sure they were waiting for us. – I was sure they were waiting for us. Other conjunctions and subjunctive words that introduce sets of objects are not omitted. If the main judgment is a perfect form of time, the historical sequence normally follows, but if the meaning corresponds to a contemporary English perfection (i.e. “have done”), it can be followed by a primary sequence: if the main judgment is a historical presence (i.e. a present with a past meaning), one can use either a primary sequence, or historical. or even, in a long sentence, a mixture of both: it is not yet known if the tense difficulties have their source in the input. There are frequent exceptions to the rule of the order of time (see Latin forms#rule of temporal order). For example, verbs in conditional clauses usually do not follow the rule: the verb in a sentence should take the form required by the temporal form of the verb in the main message It is obvious that the temporal forms of verbs in these sentences are determined by the temporal forms of verbs in the main messages.

If the action took place in the subsidiary sentence at the same time as the action in the main sentence, the simple past tense (or the continuous past, if the context so requires) is used in the subsidiary sentence. Despite the use of the subjunctive, verbal forms of time follow rules similar to those of indicative mood. This indicative of the subsidiary sentence is replaced by the subjunctive Present; In the same way, the present perfect is replaced by its corresponding form, that of the past subjunctive and the form of the past by the defect subjunctive of the past. Here is the verb in the main sentence in the simple form of the future. The subsidiary sentence also refers to an action that will occur at some point in the future. However, we use a present in the subsidiary sentence. The regulatory framework, which includes the succession of tense forms (and modes of main and subsidiary sentences) in the Italian language, generally corresponds to the “consecutio temporum” of Latin grammar. Unlike English, if the sentence is an indirect statement (which uses the accusative and infinitive construction in Latin), the order of the time forms in Latin does not apply and the temporal form of the infinitive remains unchanged, regardless of the temporal form of the root.

The present infinitiv is used for a situation that is at the same time as the main situation:[5] In English, a sequence of time forms (offset) is often used in an indirect language and similar contexts. The attracted sequence can be summarized as follows: If the main sentence of a sentence is in the past, then other verbs must express a past point of view, unless a general truth is expressed. [1] The examples below show the use of tense forms in object subsphrases as a function of the temporal form of the verb in the main sentence. Compare the use of the present in sentences that express general truths in the examples below to the use of the past form according to the rules of the temporal sequence in the following examples. Several recent studies have suggested that production errors in children with specific language impairments (SLI) such as Girls` Singing can be explained by misinterpretation of the adult grammatical dose with a similar structure (e.g.B. The boy hears the girl singing). . . .