Sometimes we just need a little help from each other to find our way on this path. In recent weeks, a number of people have emailed me about the impact of the new business terms on them. As you know, with the withdrawal from work, whether by stoppage of work or by the prohibition of overtime or other measures, collective agreements and working conditions are no longer known to Canadian labour law. We have made a number of specific exceptions, such as continuing to cover prescription drugs and creating a compassionate care clause in which individuals can continue to receive benefits in extenuating circumstances. One of the consequences of the strikes was that benefits such as holidays and personal days were no longer incurred. This gives us a say in the workplace, allows us to improve our working conditions and provides us with a fair way to address and resolve problems in the workplace. A collective agreement is a written legal contract that includes workers grouped into a single bargaining unit. The contract will be concluded through collective bargaining between the union and the employer. We have made many efforts to resolve these negotiations and return to normal functioning. We have had to find a difficult balance, because we also have an obligation to keep the postal service strong and financially viable, not only for today, but also for future generations.

In our efforts to find the right balance necessary to reach an agreement, we have done everything in our power to be fair to staff while being accountable. . . .